Time-Lapse Video of Stone Pine Pinus Pinea

I stopped the time-lapse project today, because the seedling was growing too tall and anyway, there was only waving about since the last couple of days. See for yourselves:

This time, I left the light on during the night (except for the first night). So, whenever you see a yellowish light, that’s night. There’s almost a complete day missing, because…now, let me think…it stopped recording and I hadn’t set my calender or something.

I used the Raspberry Pi Camera and the raspistill function again. One picture every 20 minutes this time.

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New Timelapse Project Started

When I looked at my ginkgo seedling in its egg carton pot today, I decided to do two things:
Re-pot it despite its young age and to make it the protagonist of my next time-lapse video.

ginkgo bilboa seedling

Ginkgo seedling

The re-potting gave me the opportunity to take a picture of it in its full dimension, roots and ginkgo seed and all. And quite a strong root it has compared to lemon trees, for example.

Setting Up The Time-lapse Project

RPi Camera setup

RPi Camera setup

Then I set upon arranging for the next time-lapse video. Made some place for the ginkgo pot and the Raspberry Pi with the camera module.

This time, I tried to get a better image section right from the start. Last time, in the time-lapse of the lemon seedlings, they grew to tall for the section.

I encountered a bit of a snag when I entered the source code into the Raspberry Pi command console: I wanted to take pictures for 40 days, but apparently somewhere between 21 and 28 days, there’s a limit. So I settled for 21 days. However, I have already made a note in my calender 21 days from now to restart the sequence. A picture will be taken every 2 hours.

So, in the end, the command line runs as follows

raspistill -o ginkgo%03d.jpg -tl 7200000 -t 1814400000 -w 1280 -h 720